Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Promoting Retention of Ontario University and College Nurse Faculty

Study Overview

Attaining an adequate supply of nurses in Ontario is dependent on attaining (and retaining) an adequate supply of nurse faculty. However, two major challenges hinder attaining an adequate supply of nurse faculty: (early) retirement (despite elimination of mandatory retirement age) and not preparing enough PhD- educated nurses to undertake faculty positions. Little is also known about the determinants of nurse faculty retention in Ontario colleges and universities or about strategies that would be effective in promoting nurse faculty retention. Understanding those factors that encourage nurse faculty to remain employed and discourage voluntary employment termination or early retirement is essential before significant investments in retention strategies should be made. Furthermore, there is almost no knowledge about nurse faculty work environments and nurse faculty responses to their work environments. This research will begin to fill in these knowledge gaps.

Study Purpose

The purpose of this research is to increase understanding of factors influencing Ontario nurse faculty intention to remain employed and to identify generation-specific incentives and disincentives influencing nurse faculty retention.

More specifically the two primary research questions are:

1. What factors influence nurse faculty intention to remain employed in Ontario colleges and universities?

2. What generation-specific incentives and disincentives influence nurse faculty intention to remain employed in Ontario colleges and universities?

Study Phases

Phase I (Now Complete)

The first phase involved focus group discussions with nurse faculty working in Ontario colleges and universities regarding what work-related factors, life circumstances, and external factors encourage them to remain in or leave their current faculty/school role. Findings were used to develop a hypothesized model of determinants of Ontario nurse faculty retention (below).

PIC-Faculty

Results from Phase 1 focus groups can be found in:
Tourangeau, A. E., Thomson, H., Saari, M., Widger, K., Ferron, E. M., & MacMillan, K. (2012). Determinants of nurse faculty intention to remain employedOpen Journal of Nursing, 2, 254-261.
Full Article
Research Recap

Phase 2 (Now Complete)

In phase 2, we developed a nurse faculty survey based on findings from phase 1 focus group discussions with nurse faculty and previous research literature. The survey was mailed to nurse faculty working in Ontario colleges and universities. Findings were used to test and refine the developed model of determinants of nurse faculty retention.

If you are a participant and would like to review the information letter for this phase of the study, please click here: Phase 2 Information Letter

Findings from the nurse faculty survey can be found in:
Tourangeau, A. E., Saari, M., Patterson, E., Thomson, H., Ferron, E. M., Widger, K., & MacMillan. K. (e-pub ahead of print). Work, work environments and other factors influencing nurse faculty intention to remain employed: A cross-sectional study. Nurse Education Today. Full Article Final published version available at DOI:10.1016/j.nedt.2013.10.010 Open LinkResearch Recap

Phase 3 (Now Complete)

In phase 3, nurse faculty, college and university decision makers, and government policy makers were invited to participate in knowledge translation sessions to discuss findings from phases 1 and 2. Knowledge translation discussions were used to validate and interpret findings, and to identify key strategies that should be implemented to strengthen Ontario nurse faculty retention. To review PDF slides from the knowledge translation sessions, please click here.

Research Team

The study is being conducted by a team of researchers from the University of Toronto and the Humber Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning and is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care. The study has received ethical approval from the University of Toronto Heath Sciences I Research Ethics Board and the Humber Research Ethics Board.

This study is now complete.


More Research